Oops! Finding and Fixing Bloopers in Fiction

Presenter: Amy J. Schneider
Copyediting fiction is like being the continuity director for a film, watching for little mistakes that pull readers out of the story. In this session, we’ll discuss (1) language bloopers: pet phrases, sound bloopers, danglers, redundancy; (2) action bloopers: Chekhov’s gun, drop-in characters, bad scene breaks, remembered elements, “As you know, Bob…”; and (3) factual bloopers: physics, body position/parts, anachronisms, geography, deliberate obfuscation, and just generally How Things Work.

Copy Editing Standards: Tables, Visual Elements, and Multimedia

Presenter: Robin Marwick
If you're comfortable copy editing text but aren't as confident when it comes to visual elements, then this introductory webinar is for you! Focusing on Professional Editorial Standard D12, Robin Marwick will teach you everything you need to know to ensure that all visuals are consistent across a document. This includes tables, graphs, headings, image caption styles, numbering, and more.

Practical Ebook Production

Presenter: Meghan Behse
This 3-part series offers in-depth instruction on the editing, formatting, proofreading and distribution of ebooks for several popular formats using a variety of software and tools. Attendees will leave the sessions with all of the tools to code a basic ebook and begin publishing online.

Usage Traps and Myths

Presenter: Frances Peck
Is impact accepted as a verb? Why are prevent and avoid so often confused? Is it okay to verbify? This webinar examines these and other usage questions and problems. We'll examine usage issues affecting today’s speech, journalism, and other writing. We’ll also examine the top five usage myths, discuss the best resources for clearing up usage questions, and—of course—practise.

Clearing the Fog: Plain Language Tips

Presenter: Frances Peck
This webinar introduces you to three reader-centred techniques and seven practical tips for making language plainer. After a quick look at what plain language is (and isn’t), we’ll discuss readers and how to shape documents to meet their needs. Then we’ll cover seven ways of revising language—such as using concrete terms, short sentences, and the ever-crucial verb—to make it easier to read. Along the way, we’ll examine real-life examples of how plain language can make even the most complex documents clear and easy to follow.